Skyline Design

Skyline Design continues to produce sustainable architectural glass featuring Bryan's woodcuts. Proudly made in Chicago, Bryan's designs are still part of their mission to create beautiful spaces in an environmentally-conscious way. The progressive techniques they use in their Digital Glass Portfolio allow a woodcut to be printed or etched directly on to the glass, resulting in stunning, wall-sized pieces of architectural glass.

Source: http://www.skydesign.com/products/designer...

Bryan Nash Gill (1961 - 2013)

Bryan Nash Gill passed away unexpectedly of natural causes on Friday, May 17, 2013.

He was the loving husband of Gina (Kiss) Gill for 12 years. Born in Hartford Hospital on Nov. 3, 1961,
Bryan grew up in Granby and Simsbury, attended Renbrook and then Westminster before earning degrees in Fine Art at Tulane and CCAC in San Francisco. A prolific artist, naturalist and gourmet, Bryan was first and foremost a friend, father and husband of profound generosity, humility and love. He was the kind of person parents want their children to become. A lover of life, endlessly curious, he could be single minded about his work but never at the expense of hospitality and laughter. Though based in New Hartford, Bryan's life was truly global with friends and professional networks across the world. Recently, his work as an artist had gained recognition in publications and exhibitions at an international level and critical success was at hand. He will be deeply missed by many, and lovingly remembered for years. To know Bryan was to know his family, the center of his world.

He is survived by his wife, Gina Kiss and son Forest Nash Gill; his mother, Elizabeth Nash Muench and step-father Thomas of Beaufort South Carolina and North Hero, Vermont; an older brother, Chas Gill, his wife Linda, and their children, Charlie and Caroline of Bowdoinham, Maine; in-laws, Larry Kiss and wife Ann of Westport, and sister-in-law, Denise Schatra and husband Kenneth of Newfane, Vermont. He also leaves step-brothers and sisters; Caren Ross and husband Gordon of New Hartford, Louise Pettit and husband Jim of Atlanta, Georgia; Larry Pratt and wife Reyna of McClean, Virginia; and Alison Forrest and husband Todd of Ridgefield. He was predeceased by his father Charles Fairchild Gill.

Covered in Ink, Smithsonian magazine

When I phoned Bryan Nash Gill last Thursday morning, he was on his way back from a boneyard. The New Hartford, Connecticut-based artist uses the term not in its traditional sense, but instead to describe a good spot for finding downed trees.

“I have a lot of boneyards in Connecticut,” says Gill. “Especially with these big storms that we have had recently. Right now, in the state, the power companies are cutting trees back eight feet from any power line. There is wood everywhere.”

Source: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-natu...

Patagonia's "The Responsible Company"

Bryan-Nash-Gill-The-Responsible-Company-Patagonia.jpg

The Responsible Company features Bryan's woodcut "Red Ash" on the cover.

In The Responsible Company, published by Patagonia, Yvon Chouinard, founder and owner of Patagonia, and Vincent Stanley, co-editor of its Footprint Chronicles, draw on their 40 years' experience at Patagonia – and knowledge of current efforts by other companies – to articulate the elements of responsible business for our time.

Source: http://www.patagonia.com/us/product/the-re...

Tall Tales: The Story of Trees

Mr. Gill, who is based in New Hartford, Conn., starts with pieces of dead or damaged wood salvaged from his area. He cuts through the wood until he finds an engaging section—perhaps where the tree divides or branches intersect.

Then he sands the block as smooth as possible (so that the paper won't crease when placed on the wood) and burns and brushes the block (to reduce the areas of soft wood between the growth rings, making them more distinct)...

 CEDAR BURL Bryan Nash Gill/Princeton Architectural Press

 CEDAR BURL Bryan Nash Gill/Princeton Architectural Press

Source: http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB100014240527...

"Beyond the Landscape", Litchfield County Times

“Willow,” 49 5/8” x 38 5/8”, relief print, 2011, by Bryan Nash Gill

“Willow,” 49 5/8” x 38 5/8”, relief print, 2011, by Bryan Nash Gill

“Woodcut,” published by Princeton Architectural Press (www.papress.com), features Mr. Gill’s large-scale relief prints made from cross-sections of trees. Woodcut includes 100 color illustrations, an introduction by writer Verlyn Klinkenborg, and an interview with the artist detailing his printmaking process.

Mr. Gill creates abstract sculptures, works on paper, and installations that are inextricably bound to the materials and inspiration he finds in nature, working and living in a rural New England setting. Massive sections of tree trunks are cut and carved; branches and leaves are re-interpreted in bronze; and the growth rings on cross-sections of trees are inked and transferred to hand-made paper.

Source: http://www.countytimes.com/articles/2012/0...

Sculpture magazine 2006, Patricia Rosoff

The central tension in Bryan Nash Gill's work is generated from its relation to landscape, so often the province of painting. Gill's is a sculptor's take, however, literally and metaphorically. His work is clearly composed of nature-tree branches and bark, woodsy flora like fungi and cabbages, leaves and seed pods, as well as deer hides and even desiccated orange peels. Still, what is striking about a gathering of these forms in a gallery, translated as they are by sub-tractive carving, reconstruction, and recasting, is the way they insist on an aesthetic of first-hand experience.

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Sculpture magazine 2002, Patricia Rosoff

"Wheels in the fields" was the phrase that popped up in one of Bryan Nash Gill's graduate school critiques at the California College of Arts and Crafts. It was an image of old farm implements rusting amid the rising growth of a farmer's field that this Connecticut farm boy had carried in some forgotten back pocket as he peregrinated from New England to New Orleans (to study glass blowing), to Italy (to study stone carving), to California (where he sought to discover the difference between art and craft), and to various primitive cold-water studio/ aeries in Colorado deserts, California mountainsides, lower Manhattan, and the northern extremities of Maine (where he later set up shop).

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